FAQ

 

Contents:

 

1. Why choosing Cambridge Centre for Mindfulness?

2. What is Mindfulness?

3. What is MBCT (Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy) and how is it different from other forms of Mindfulness practices?

4. Is Mindfulness for me?

5. What do the MBCT programme do?

6. What would be expected of me, if I want to participate?

 

1. Why choosing Cambridge Centre for Mindfulness?

The Cambridge Centre for Mindfulness is unique in being completely secular and run by highly specialized health professionals, who have a recognised core profession and have followed specialist training to deliver Mindfulness Based interventions.

Our facilitators are trained clinicians, with postgraduate training and qualifications in psychology. Our facilitators have carried out specific professional training to deliver Mindfulness interventions, practice Mindfulness in their daily lives and are committed to continuous professional development, receiving clinical supervision as relevant to their professional backgrounds. They are also active in clinical practice and research, and obey by ethical guidelines of professional regulatory bodies: The Health Professionals Council (HPC), The British Psychological Society (BPS) and the British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP).

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2. What is Mindfulness?

Mindfulness is an ancient practice, dating back to over two-thousand years. Over the last three decades Mindfulness has been the object of intensive scientific research. This research has led to the structuring of practices into a programme, available to all, irrespective of personal philosophical views or religious beliefs.

An ever-growing body of research have proven than the regular practice of Mindfulness can relieve stress, help to deal effectively with emotional difficulties and overall aid personal growth and well-being.

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3. What is MBCT (Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy) and how is it different from other forms of Mindfulness practices?

Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy is a psychotherapeutic approach, combining meditation practices with psychological knowledge, particularly Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). Most of the current research on the effectiveness of Mindfulness is based on this programme. The programme is a structured psychotherapeutic approach, which follows a research-based therapeutic protocol.

MBCT differs from other forms of Mindfulness based practices mostly by the integrity on which it is delivered. To deliver MBCT, therapists need to have a core profession, be regulated by a professional body and carry out ongoing continuous professional development as well as receiving clinical supervision. Other forms of Meditation programmes, including the MBSR (Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction) do not have such requirements, and their delivery as well as their contents change widely, from group to group and practitioner to practitioner.

Mindfulness is a way of paying attention to the present moment, on purpose and non-judgementally. Mindfulness teach us a different way of relating to our thoughts, emotions and physical sensations, and by doing this enabling us to manage stress, discomfort and difficult emotions more effectively.

The practice of Mindfulness is proven to help with stress, anxiety, depression, and overall to manage difficult emotions. It has also been proven that its regular practice can have positive effects on physical health, particularly with regards to the management of chronic pain, and problems such as hypertension and heart disease.

Anyone can learn Mindfulness, and participants of MBCT programmes often described their experience as life-changing.

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4. Is Mindfulness for me?

and Pre-Occupied? Do you sometimes feel that life passes by very quickly? Do you find yourself hooked in the past, worried about the future or constantly going over events in your life and over-analysing?Do you find yourself under stress? Perhaps Mindless

Then Mindfulness could be for you.

Mindfulness helps to re-connect with the present moment, as it unfolds. Mindfulness helps the busy/ troubled mind to settle and as such helps re-gain control whilst engaging positively with the busy-ness of everyday life.

Mindfulness is open to anyone who is willing to experience it.

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5. What do the MBCT programme do?

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) programmes are a psychological approach which combines the practices of well-researched and structured Mindfulness programmes to the particular needs of participants.

The MBCT programme was developed by Segal, Williams and Teasdale, initially as a relapse prevention programme for depression. At present, this programme is used widely for personal development, and overall for the management of stress and developing well-being. The programme follows an eight-week structured model and encourage participants to actively practice in-between sessions.

For an independent review, please refer to the website of the Mental Health Foundation: www.bemindful.co.uk

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6. What would be expected of me, if I want to participate?

The programme is thought of as teaching /practice classes and not as therapeutic groups. As such, the participants of a group will share their experience of putting mindfulness into practice, but would not be expected to talk about personal life experiences unrelated to mindfulness practice.

You do not need to possess any particular attributes to benefit from the programme. You will however be expected to maintain,

• A beginner’s mind

Approaching the practices with curiosity and the sense of naivity of doing things for the first time,

• A commitment to attend and doing your best

Taking part requires a commitment to attend all the classes and practice in-between sessions. There are no right or wrong ways of practicing and you will be encouraged to engage with the experience of Mindfulness by following the programme.

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